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    Audio Forensics Software


    Hi,
    I have an audio file from which I cut out some portions and merge the remainder of the file to form a single audio file. Can someone suggest be a good Audio software which can help identify the cutting points in that audio file?

    Thanks

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    I believe that only you, as the person who performed the cuts, could tell what criteria you used for where to make those cuts, and thus stand any chance of finding them.

    -- Keith W. Blackwell
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    If the cuts where badly made (for example, if there are clicks) they should be easy to find by ear. Software can also help.

    In a less extreme situation, maybe some of the background noises do not match exactly, even if the cut was made "perfectly" by matching the waveform at 0 at the joining point.
    A program with spectral display (e.g. Audacity) could help here.

    If the cuts have been well made, you have no real chance of finding them by ear or with normal software.

    Even forensic analysis software might not help. This kind of analysis was much easier before the digital age and sample editors come along. - cut and past is easier to find when done on tape.

    I want to believe.
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    Although I actually agree with Zimbot here, I will fulfil your request nonetheless and give you a recommendation.

    I use iZotope RX a lot for audio analysis and editing in the context of forensics. It's an amazing piece of software but not free. The reason why this trumps other FFT and spectrum analysers is that you can see the waveform superimposed on the spectrum and play in real time, so it's easier to establish drastic changes in the frequency content between regions of audio. This is not fool-proof though and takes a lot of experience to see it.

    Audacity the free program has a spectrum analyser https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VZbZa99ocPU


    I am the thing that goes bump in the night...

    Freesound Housekeeper
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    The 'problem' is that if the editing is done by anyone that is not an absolute idiot or noob, and using portions of the same recording, it is almost impossible to find the edit points.

    Some basic techniques, such as cutting and merging at zero crossings, are all you need.
    These techniques are used in electronic music editing. When well done, these edits are seamless.

    I want to believe.
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    This was the original question on this thread:

    adeelrizvi wrote:
    I have an audio file from which I cut out some portions and merge the remainder of the file to form a single audio file. Can someone suggest be a good Audio software which can help identify the cutting points in that audio file?

    To which I answer:
    "(...) using portions of the same recording, it is almost impossible to find the edit points."
    Because, unless the person doing it is a complete noob or very sloppy he/she will know to use
    "some basic techniques, such as cutting and merging at zero crossings".

    So we are talking about cutting and pasting portions of the same recording to turn it into something different.
    We were not talking about
    a) taking portions of different recordings and splicing those together
    b) 'mixing', which means overlapping recordings. We were talking about splicing things together in a different order.

    I want to believe.
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    Only an observer here but (thanks!) this was a fascinating thread!

    PS: "try mixing all Lady Gaga tracks into one"

    Now there's an experiment. smile

    /* PS I am aka "Die, Master Monkey", designer of "Dronesound TV" at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBJjDo7AnKcpO5s9hNs1ngg */

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